Is Sleep Apnea Ruining Your Life?

INTRODUCTION

Do you wake up in the morning feeling just as tired as when you went to sleep? Have you been told that you snore loudly and seem to stop breathing while sleeping? Then it is possible that you are suffering from Sleep Apnea. Read on to find out more about the symptoms and diagnosis of this condition.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep Apnoea or as it is more commonly known as Sleep Apnea is a relatively common problem. It causes broken sleep patterns that usually lead to increased tiredness and decreased awareness in waking hours, morning headaches or a dry throat when you wake up. The clinical definition of apnea is a cessation of breath that lasts for at least 10 seconds. The medical condition called “Sleep Apnea” is a condition where sufferers stop breathing and have repeated apneas over extended periods of time while sleeping.

The most common form is Obstructive Sleep Apnea (or OSA),and this is where the airway has collapsed or becomes blocked during sleep. When you try to breathe, any air that squeezes past the blockage usually causes loud snoring which is nearly always associated with OSA. During an apnea, where breathing stops altogether, the concentration of oxygen in your blood drops, as your lungs are not receiving any fresh air or oxygen to replenish your blood in exchange for carbon dioxide until it reaches dangerously low levels that are low enough to trigger your brain to disturb your sleep. The associated reflex action helps tighten the upper airway muscles and open your windpipe.

How is Sleep Apnea Diagnosed?

There is no blood or other post event test for diagnosing the condition, and as such it is normally first diagnosed as a result of comments or complaints from your sleeping partners or family who have become concerned about your chronic snoring, choking or gasping during your sleep as well as the extended periods where you stop breathing altogether while asleep. Sleep Apnea can be a life threatening condition with the reduced sleep quality and the frequent drops in the blood oxygen levels during the apnea triggering the release of stress hormones. These hormones, among other issues, raise your heart rate and increase your risk of high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases and associated problems. Click here.

So What Should You Do?

Your partner is worried about your breathing or snoring, you continually feel tired during the day,and you suspect that you may have a sleeping disorder, what should you do next? The first step is to arrange an appointment with your family medical practitioner to discuss your concerns. You practitioner will probably then arrange an appointment for you to see a Sleep Specialist and maybe have a sleep study undertaken. Prior to your appointment it usually helps to compile a sleep diary for at least a few days or longer if possible with you or more likely your sleep partner recording how you sleep, if you are having trouble breathing during the night, any noticeable gaps in breathing, choking or gasping events, your snoring, how loud it is as well how your sleeping position impacts on it, and how you feel in the morning when you wake up and then during the day.

CONCLUSION

This is usually the first step on the path to diagnosis and eventually treatment of sleep apnea. The risks associated with failure to act, if you are a Sleep Apnea sufferer, are too great to ignore and should not be taken lightly. If you suspect that you have a sleep disorder such as Sleep Apnea take steps now, get yourself assessed, it could be a lifesaving action. More details in site: https://www.afinilexpress.com/buy-armodafinil-online-waklert-150

 

Sleep Disorders – Do You Suffer From One?

Types of Sleep Disorders

Different kinds of sleep disorders keep people awake and prohibit proper sleep. Sleep disorders range from the natural, self-correcting issues to neurological and physical disorders. Sleep disorders prohibit people from resting correctly whether it’s getting to sleep, staying asleep, or cycling through the stages of sleep. Sleep is important to the body’s ability to heal, to cultivate information, to relax, to function, and to digest.

While a person can stay awake for days on end, they will start to suffer the disable effects of sleep hardship such as a breakdown in cognitive functions, weight gain and an exhausted immune system. Sleep disorders are about more than missing one night of sleep now and again; sleep disorders display a determined inability to rest.

Apnea Sleep Disorders

Apnea sleep disorders are connect directly to respiratory issues. Hypopnea syndrome display very slow or shallow breathing while sleeping. The shallow breathing can sound like mild gasping or wheezing and decreases the level of oxygen concentration in the blood. The heart must pump strongly to get enough oxygen. Obstructive sleep apnea is commonly caused by a physical weakness or defect in the soft tissue of the throat. While sleeping, a person with OSA will regularly stop breathing due to the soft tissue blocking and collapsing the airway. They will experience an alert to waking, gasping and choking for air.

The alert episodes develop certain times during the night even though the patient may only remember one in five of the waking episodes. Obstructive sleep apnea may be amended by surgery. Central sleep apnea is caused by a neurological problem. The brain decline to send the correct messages to the muscles controlling your breathing. Causes of central sleep apnea are related to neurological diseases, surgery, stroke and spinal damage. Basic snoring differs from the snoring related with apnea disorders.

Most people snore at one point or another. Physical causes of snoring include a vary septum, hypertrophy of the adenoids, tongue enlargement, swollen tonsils, and a small oropharynx. Colds and allergies also cause snoring. Snoring alone is not suggestive of a sleep disorder, but this snoring can keep other people awake.

Movement Disorders

Movement disorders disturb sleep design and the ability of the body to manage the different stages sleep because actually they are acting or moving.

The physical action may wake them up or prohibit them from sleeping. The most well-known movement sleep disorder is disturbed legs syndrome (RLS). RLS causes an avoidable longing to move or shift the legs. People who experience RLS disagree of a crawly, creepy or pins and needles sensation. RLS patients often suffer from periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) which causes sudden bump of the legs or arms while sleeping.

Periodically, a person’s leg or arm will jiggle as their muscles relax, but PLMD causes involuntary and persistent motions that can jerk them awake.

Bruxism is the clenching or grinding of the teeth while a person is sleeping. The disorder can cause headaches, dental problems and general soreness of the jaw. Somnambulism is another movement disorder that is neurological in nature. Sleepwalking can cause a person to get up and employ in day-to-day activities without any information of what they are doing. Sleepwalkers experience unidentified injuries and physical tiredness related to not resting correctly.

The last sleep development disorder including a lack of movement or sleep paralysis. The paralysis disturb the physical body briefly just before falling asleep or upon waking. A person with sleep paralysis commonly experiences tactile, visual or auditory hallucinations and are commonly suffering from narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is a disorder where a person falls asleep inexplicable and quickly, during normal waking hours.

Other Sleep Disorders

Other sleep disorders that affect people involve rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD), late sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), parasomnia, situational circadian and night terrors rhythm sleep disorder. RBD causes patients to act out their violent or dramatic dreams while sleeping. For example, a person dreaming about punching a monster in a bad dream may physically beat out with a first. Night terrors are different from dream in that they cause severe, crude alert from sleep experience terror.

A child who experiences night terrors may wake shouting and weak to accept satisfaction. Many patients who experience night terrors do not remember them upon waking, but do experience daytime sleepiness and stress associated with the physical terror response. Night terrors are studied a parasomnia as is sleep talking and walking during sleep. DSPS include an abnormal circadian rhythm.

sleep problems

The natural circadian rhythm involves waking in daylight hours and sleeping at night. A person with DSPS experiences hardship in sleeping at night and being awake during the day. A natural recourse for DSPS patients is to work off hours in order to manage their career with their waking hours. learn more detailed information at http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/communities/north-county/sd-no-narcolepsy-20170125-story.html

Specific circadian rhythm sleep disorder is different in that it is experienced by individuals with a normal circadian rhythm who are impacted by outside, environmental factors. A person working third shift routinely who fight to stay awake when they want to sleep.

Identifying Sleep Disorders

If a person suspects they are experiencing from a sleep disorder, it is necessary to bring the data to the attention of a physician. Everybody experiences an irregular sleepless night, but determined daytime sleepiness, difficulty snoring or sleeping may indicate a sleep disorder.